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Tragic footballer Sala and pilot ‘exposed to carbon monoxide’

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(FILES) File photo released by Cardiff City FC via Noticias Argentinas taken on January 20, 2019 showing Argentine footballer Emiliano Sala posing with Cardiff’s jersey after signing for the club, in Cardiff, UK. – Argentine footballer Emiliano Sala’s body is to be returned to Argentina on Friday for his wake at the Club Atletico y Social San Martin in his hometown Progreso, Santa Fe province. Sala’s body was recovered from plane wreckage in the English Channel last week. He was flying to his new team, English Premier League side Cardiff City, from his old French club Nantes when his plane went missing over the Channel on January 21. (Photo by HO / NOTICIAS ARGENTINAS / AFP) / – Argentina OUT /

Footballer Emiliano Sala and the pilot flying his plane when it crashed were likely exposed to “potentially fatal” levels of carbon monoxide, investigators announced on Wednesday.

“Toxicology tests found that the passenger had a high saturation level of COHb (the combination product of carbon monoxide and haemoglobin),” Britain’s Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB) said in a special bulletin.

“It is considered likely that the pilot would also have been exposed to carbon monoxide,” it added.

The Argentinian was flying to Wales from France to join Premier League club Cardiff when his plane came down in the English Channel on January 21 during a night-time flight.

His body was recovered, but that of pilot David Ibbotson has never been found.

Toxicology tests on Sala showed a carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) saturation level of 58 percent, according to the AAIB.

“A COHb level of 50 percent or above in an otherwise healthy individual is generally considered to be potentially fatal.”

The bulletin said that carbon monoxide poisoning was a particular risk in the type of aircraft they were travelling in.

“Piston engine aircraft produce high concentrations of CO that are conveyed away from the aircraft through the exhaust system,” said investigators.

“Poor sealing of the cabin or leaks into the heating and ventilation system from the exhaust can provide pathways for CO to enter the cabin.

“In this type of aircraft, the cockpit is not separated from the cabin and it is considered likely that the pilot would also have been affected to some extent by exposure to CO.”

Exposure to the gas can lead to damage to the brain and nervous system, with unconsciousness and heart attacks possible with COHb levels of over 50 percent.

“It is clear from the symptoms that exposure to CO can reduce or inhibit a pilot’s ability to fly an aircraft depending on the level of that exposure,” added the bulletin.

Attention had previously focussed on pilot Ibbotson, who it was reported was not authorised to fly at night.

The BBC said Ibbotson was colour blind, which would have automatically disqualified him from night flights.

The AAIB also said the plane carrying Sala was not authorised to make commercial flights.

But the investigators pointed out that Ibbotson had in the past transported people on a cost-share basis, which is authorised by the regulation for small planes.


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