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How cryptocurrencies are being regulated around the world

It is safe to say the world of cryptocurrency is constantly changing. While some countries have yet to define a clear stance on whether cryptocurrencies are considered securities, other countries have taken strong stances on regulating them. For example, it's illegal for citizens to use cryptocurrency as a means of payment in Belarus.  Cryptocurrencies are…

It is safe to say the world of cryptocurrency is constantly changing. While some countries have yet to define a clear stance on whether cryptocurrencies are considered securities, other countries have taken strong stances on regulating them. For example, it’s illegal for citizens to use cryptocurrency as a means of payment in Belarus. 

Cryptocurrencies are being used as an alternative form of currency in Nigeria and Bolivia due to hyperinflation. At the same time, China has banned all ICOs and exchanges from operating within their country because they don’t want to deal with the potential risks of trading digital currencies. 

There are many different paths that governments around the world could take when regulating this new asset class that we’re seeing emerge before our eyes. This blog post will discuss how different countries are regulating cryptocurrencies.

Canada
As the interest in cryptocurrency grows, so does the need for regulation surrounding it. In Canada, a few organizations are taking charge of this issue. The Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA) and the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC) are working to create regulations that will protect investors while allowing for innovation within the cryptocurrency space. 

As for now, cryptocurrencies are not legal tender in Canada. This means that you cannot use them to pay for goods or services. However, this does not mean that they cannot be used. You can still use cryptocurrencies to buy goods and services, but you may need to find a seller willing to accept them. 

Australia
Cryptocurrencies and exchanges are legal in Australia, but there is a lack of clarity about the regulatory environment. The Australian Transaction Reports and Analysis Centre (AUSTRAC) has clarified that cryptocurrencies do not fall under its remit as it is an emerging technology. 

However, cryptocurrency exchanges may be regulated by AUSTRAC if they provide services to customers or businesses for goods or services other than cryptocurrencies. The Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) also states that those who wish to operate as a digital currency exchange need to seek authorization from ASIC before commencing operations because operating a digital currency exchange without consent carries penalties, imprisonment or fines.

Singapore
Cryptocurrency trading is legal in Singapore, and Bitcoins are treated as goods. The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) has issued cryptocurrency guidelines for businesses to conduct transactions with cryptocurrencies. The MAS also regulates the activities of cryptocurrency exchanges, intermediaries between buyers and sellers who facilitate the conversion of fiat currency into virtual currencies or vice versa. 

They have set out a framework that requires these entities to be authorized by the MAS before operating in Singapore. The Guidelines require these entities to put in place appropriate policies, procedures, controls and systems covering key areas including anti-money laundering/combating financing terrorism (AML/CFT), customer due diligence (CDD), countering the financing of terrorism (CFT), privacy protection, recordkeeping, and cybersecurity threats.

United States
The U.S government has been exploring the idea of regulating cryptocurrency as a security, which would require that any transactions be registered with the SEC and subject to state law. This means that cryptocurrencies could no longer be traded anonymously across borders without third-party verification from financial institutions. The main debate surrounding this topic is whether regulation will help or hinder crypto’s growth and innovation potential in America. 

The pros: stricter regulation will decrease fraud, increase transparency for investors, provide more accountability to those who trade cryptos, and clarify how cryptos should be taxed by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). 

The cons: excessive regulations may impede progress, such as lowering transaction speeds and increasing costs for consumers; it also doesn’t solve problems like money laundering.

Bottom Line
Blockchain and cryptocurrencies are relatively new. What the future holds for them is still unknown. Still, as they grow in popularity, it will be interesting to see how each country reacts to regulating what could potentially become a trillion-dollar industry. 

This has been an overview of some countries’ stances on cryptocurrency regulation so far; we hope you found this article informative! If you want to start trading and reap the benefits of cryptocurrencies, visit dogecoin millionaire