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Firm to tackle unemployment through tech career for youths

By Ngozi Egenuka
02 November 2021   |   3:28 am
To tackle unemployment and improve earnings of youths, African tech talent startup, TalentQL, has launched AltSchool Africa for the development of software engineering skills and soft skills.

To tackle unemployment and improve earnings of youths, African tech talent startup, TalentQL, has launched AltSchool Africa for the development of software engineering skills and soft skills.

The school allows individuals and those that finished secondary school to build a career in tech, to earn a top-rated diploma in software engineering within a year.

Speaking at a media parley, Chief Executive Officer, TalentQL, said: “For nine months, participants would receive training in software development after which they undergo a three month internship. At the end, they get a diploma certificate. Currently, the startup is partnering with Michael and Cecilia Ibru’s University to issue certificates.”

He noted that students do not need to have a tech background to apply for the programme and it is open to everyone above the age of 16, adding that there is no tuition fee required but participants would pay a ₦10,000 application fee.

According to him, AltSchool Africa has a broad curriculum structure designed to impart knowledge required to gain employment as a qualified software engineer without the rigours of a traditional four-year undergraduate degree programme.

He added that students could take advantage of a flexible study schedule to complete all the modules while attending to their existing professional and personal commitments.

On tuition fees, Yusuf noted that the school does not charge tuition upfront, adding that the school would extract its fee from the graduate’s salary under an Income-Sharing Agreement (ISA).

Chief Operating Officer, AltSchool, Racheal Onoja, said candidates will receive an email containing home study kits after application, adding that they would be required to study with the kits as their assessment would be based on its contents.

“The students would be tested on the basis of the home study kit. There will be two phases of the assessment; early bird and latecomers. We want to know if you are good enough to get into the programme because we need smart ones,” she said.

According to her, the ‘early bird’ phase will be for the early applicants who apply between now and the end of November. These ones will write their first assessment in early January. This gives them at least one month to prepare. Their assessment result would determine if their application is successful or not. Onoja said that learning would include a mentor-based system, which allows a mentor-mentee relationship.