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Travis Scott And Astroworld Organisers Sued Over Death Of Unborn Baby

By Chinelo Eze
14 May 2022   |   2:09 pm
A woman, Shanazia Williamson, has sued Travis Scott after she lost her pregnancy at Astroworld festival. The woman who sustained injuries sued Scott's promoter Live Nation, ScoreMore, security company Valle Services SMG, ASM Global, and the Harris County Sports and Convention corporation for wrongful death. The document from Shanazia and her husband Jarawd Owens of…

A woman, Shanazia Williamson, has sued Travis Scott after she lost her pregnancy at Astroworld festival.

The woman who sustained injuries sued Scott’s promoter Live Nation, ScoreMore, security company Valle Services SMG, ASM Global, and the Harris County Sports and Convention corporation for wrongful death.

The document from Shanazia and her husband Jarawd Owens of Dayton, Ohio showed that they were expecting a child before the festival was filed last December but has not been previously reported.

According to the suit document, “While in attendance at the festival, Shanazia was trampled and crushed resulting in horrific injuries and ultimately the death of her and Jarawd’s unborn child.” 

Shanazia sustained several injuries to her shoulder, back, leg, chest, stomach and other parts of her body.

The document further stated that the organisers failed to plan, design, manage, operate, staff and maintain decorum which led to Shanazia’s injuries and the death of her unborn son. 

According to the suit claims,  the defendants were careless for various reasons including ineffective security and medical staff for the festival along with neglecting safety hazards, among numerous other claims.

Williamson and Owens’s attorneys Jason Itkin and Kurt Arnold refused to comment on the case, referring to February’s gag order restricting what lawyers can disclose publicly about Astroworld cases.

The couple’s suit is a complicated case arising from the festival, as it  holds the same implications that drive the discussions on when life begins. 

It is uncertain the legal implications of this case brought by Williamson and Owen.