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Almajiri: Generation of future leaders wasting away

By Abdulganiyu Alabi, Kaduna 
20 December 2020   |   3:23 am
The Executive Director of Civil Society Legislative Advocacy Centre (CISLAC), Auwal Musa, has said Almajiri system in the North is wasting away a generation...

[files] Almajiri. PHOTO: TVC

The Executive Director of Civil Society Legislative Advocacy Centre (CISLAC), Auwal Musa, has said Almajiri system in the North is wasting away a generation of potential future leaders.  

Musa said this at a one-day dialogue on Advancing The Rights Of Almajiri In Nigeria, organised by CISLAC in collaboration with Almajiri Child Initiative (ACRI) and 3logy, to create a platform for dialogue and framework for Almajirai and street children, who have been victims of insecurity, poverty, and lack of access to basic education.

Musa warned of an impending danger attached to the growing numbers of children on the streets, noting that 80 per cent of out-of-school children were from the region.  

“It is from the same North we have issues of insecurity, poverty, and unemployment. If this number continues to grow, then, we are really in trouble,” he said, adding: “That is why we are working with all stakeholders to reform the Almajiri system in the country.”

He said the Almajiri system was bastardised by negligence from people shying away from their parental responsibilities…

“We cannot afford to waste a huge generation of potential leaders. There is no way a country can develop in terms of science and technology if we do not harness youths’ strength that is already denied access to basic necessities for their upbringing. 

“We are losing our kids for no just cause, other than negligence and lack of concern from the people that matter. That is why CISLAC is bringing together individuals from various organisations to see how we can develop an advocacy framework that can ensure that the government takes decisive action to protect and save the children.  

“Many of these children have been abused. Some are recruited into criminal activities. They can be useful to the nation,” Musa said.

He said an ideal Almajiranci system is far from sending kids away to cater for themselves or beg on the streets.  

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