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Obasanjo, Anyaoku, others lament Nigeria’s lack of domestic, foreign policies

By Osiberoha Osibe, Awka
09 March 2022   |   4:26 am
In view of the lack of adequate domestic and foreign policies in the country, stakeholders have expressed support for better domestic and foreign policies to return Nigeria to the era of afro-centric activities.

Former Secretary General of the Commonwealth, Chief Emeka Anyaoku (left); former President Olusegun Obasanjo and former Governor of Anambra State, Peter Obi during a symposium at Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka…yesterday. PHOTO: NAN

In view of the lack of adequate domestic and foreign policies in the country, stakeholders have expressed support for better domestic and foreign policies to return Nigeria to the era of afro-centric activities.

The stakeholders made this known at the maiden symposium of former Secretary-General of the Commonwealth of Nations, Emeka Anyaoku’s Institute of International Studies and Diplomacy at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University (NAU), Awka, Anambra State with the theme: Nigeria In The Comity Of Nations.

Speaking at the event, former President Olusegun Obasanjo, said Nigeria, as the most populous country in black Africa, wielded enormous influence in the fight against oppression of the South African Apartheid System.

Obasanjo, who was the Chairman of the occasion, pointed out that a lot was achieved when African leaders set up Eminent African Personalities to brainstorm on ways and means to synergise to fight against Apartheid.

He said that the strong afro-centric policy of his administration saw Nigeria become a member of Frontline States, even when the country could not be geographically located among the membership.

He added that Nigeria set out to work with other African leaders in identified non-imposition of leaders, if only to succeed in achieving political union and economic integration, insisting that Nigeria is not presently powerless, but only battling with internal contradictions.

Speaking, Anyaoku, who expressed delight at the honour accorded him in NAU, with the naming of the institute after him, lamented that Nigeria’s global standing had declined.

“Nigeria’s passport is treated with contempt in most parts of the world. We have a lot of work to do in terms of raising the country’s profile in the comity of Nations. As such, there is the need to do a lot of work to win back the respect, not for Nigeria and other black Africans alone, but also non-black worldwide.”

Anyaoku noted that the dehumanised slave trade thrived and was justified, because blacks were considered sub-human, a mindset that gave rise to racism. But when a black person distinguishes himself in the midst of white people, he is described as “exceptional.”

He said: “Nigeria has what it takes to lead African nations to win back respect for the country and blacks all over the world.”

For Nigeria to chart the path of success, the government should mobilise the citizens to embrace education, increase the budget for education and empowerment of human capital resources.”

On his part, a discussant, Prof. Jide Idowu Osuntokun, said there was the need for Nigeria to adopt all-inclusive policy measures, anchored on equity, justice and fair play.

Another resource person, Ambassador Joe Keshi said from inception, Nigeria launched into meaningful, strategic diplomatic measures, lamenting that the drift to make Nigeria’s greatness in foreign policy was felt lately.