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RAPAN charges government on freedom of information

By Kemi Sokoya   |   09 June 2017   |   4:22 am


The Records and Archives Professional Association of Nigeria (RAPAN) has urged the National Assembly to consider a bill that would enshrine the culture of professional Records and Archives management in the country.

This, according to the group, will help to promote excellence in the acquisition and application of knowledge and skills by practitioners, thereby contributing to sustainable national development.

President of RAPAN, Adejuwon Akinfolurin, who made the call yesterday in a statement, added that the body was set to partner with other professional bodies globally in celebrating this year’s International Archives Day (IAD), which holds today.

“RAPAN is a body of corporate, individual records and archives professionals, responsible for regulating the practice of records, archives and allied services in Nigeria.

“It is also responsible for negotiating and consulting with all tiers of government and private organisations, as well as the international community on policies affecting the conduct and practice of archivists, records and information managers and other professionals.”

“We call for an urgent legislation on professional records and archives to keep Nigeria in line with the UNESCO’s directive to developing countries to put in place a robust repository of data preservation that will keep and secure records of governance,” he said.

Akinfolurin urged the Federal Government to play a leading role in this area to ensure that the Freedom of Information (FOI) Act 2011 was not a waste of taxpayer’s money.

It lamented that country had suffered setbacks due to poor records keeping culture, adding: “In Nigeria, poor records keeping culture has paralyzed so many brilliant initiatives. Scientific research has come to a halt due to lack of adequate records, while promotion of workers has been stalled, giving room for fraudulent practices.”




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