Wednesday, 7th December 2022
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2023: Imperatives of seismic shifts

A fundamental axiom encapsulated in the highest law of Nigeria is that power belongs to the people through and by whom government derives its powers and legitimacy.

[FILES] Ballot box

Sir: A fundamental axiom encapsulated in the highest law of Nigeria is that power belongs to the people through and by whom government derives its powers and legitimacy.

Consequently, there is an ingrained umbilical nexus between the people and the manner of the emergence of holders of governmental powers in a democratic milieu. A notable philosopher laconised it as a social contract.

Events preceding the conduct of the 2023 elections are manifesting trappings of some paradigms. From the remarkable enthusiasm shown by new voter registrants through the convoluted party primaries to the evolution of youth assertiveness and diaspora ‘mobilisation’, there appears some threshold for dramatic though propitious expectations.

First, is the selection of party (presidential) candidates. The burgeoning Electoral Act 2022 saliently inaugurated an enthralling milieu that outlandishly limited the number of party participating delegates and unwittingly but expectedly witnessed the untoward vice of monetised suffrage.

In the unwonted process, principles and agreements were compromised. The eternal and wholesome seasoning for nation-building was scorned. A fundamental prerequisite envisioned as state policy was negated. Social justice, the prime imprimatur of Nigeria’s political objective, was pointedly pulverised. In the interim, many did not anticipate that orthodoxy would suffer the challenge

C J Okoli-Akirika is an Awka-based lawyer.

A presidential aspirant clamoured for social justice and competence during his party’s primary election.

Another presidential candidate wittingly and unwittingly found neither appeal nor merit for it. In due course, a gallant state governor, though not altogether without blemish, is now belatedly insisting on it to the discomfiture of instigators of injustice and promoters of callous insensitivity.

An astute clairvoyant, a trending and undisguised apostle of good and accountable governance foresaw the impending charade and concomitant comeuppance. He opted for the unfancied but unfazed mustered seed of Nigerian politics. A paradigm decision that is engendering seismic shifts.

When his admirers were tasked with overzealousness real or imagined, he apologised and called for circumspection. In the face of vituperative and calumnious criticism, he remained cool and unruffled.

Nigerians should be concerned with voting out bad leaders. Without a doubt, bad governance cannot be justified on grounds of tribe and religion. Neither the contours of a parlous economy nor the prevalence of precarious insecurity discriminates on basis of tribe and religion.

Herein lies the seismic shift Nigerians should vote for in 2023.