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The unproven treatment of COVID-19

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For several months now, coronavirus has enveloped the world and like a cocoon to a larva, it has continued to rage, gnaw towards the west and other parts of the world. When you expect it to subside, cases of infected persons continue to rise.

The coronavirus pandemic has revealed that most countries around the world have paid mammoth attention to their efforts to develop and build a large weapon while paying scarce attention towards improving infrastructure for health care and the delivery of medical services. In a country where few people can afford quality medical care, alternative treatments of coronavirus have boomed and are being exploited.

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In Lagos, for instance, you often hear of ‘’omo alagbo’’ herbs seller, they hawk all sorts of herbs alleging it could cure all illnesses. There are hundreds of unproven treatments of COVID-19 out there; one problem is that virtually everyone has a different idea about the best way to treat it.                                                              

The most baffling thing is that some politicians in different parts of the world are promoting them, whether out of genuine concern or a desire to offer hope and deflect responsibility.... no one can say with accuracy but one thing we all know is that COVID-19 has become part of us and we all must self protect ourselves.
 
As a matter of fact, Mehmet Kasim Alageyik put his concoctions on par with modern medicine, he said “no disease or ailment can withstand his remedies,’’ he went on to claim that he has cured dozens of conditions from skin cancer to cerebral palsy. He called on the government to come to have it and run a test on it.

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An Ijebu man, from the Western part of Nigeria who lives in Lagos suburb, boasted that from ages, chicken soup has been recommended as a natural cure for the common cold that has worked for him. ‘’I have been taken pepper soup for six decades to drive severe cold, so corolla, sorry coronavirus has no place in my body.’’

However, ‘’Capsicum commonly known as pepper has some antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral properties but there is no evidence that it can cure coronavirus,’’ according to a Lagos-based Pharmacist, Sinmisola Aloko.

In every part of the world, core science has had to struggle for attention with pet theories, rumours, and traditional beliefs during this pandemic.

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What is troubling is that reports across the world have testified that the use of herbs like turmeric, garlic, ginger, honey, vitamin-C has amplified since the arrival of COVID-19.  Most of these claims have been met with a wall of skepticism especially from medical practitioners. The general public must stop the indiscriminate use of most of these drugs as it might harm their bodies.                                                      

Medical experts say chlorine dioxide is, at best, a placebo — and, as with any placebo, people might credit it for their recoveries. Those who advocate chlorine dioxide “create a false sense of security,” Virgilio Prieto, director of epidemiology at Bolivia’s Health Ministry, said in an interview. “By promoting its indiscriminate and irresponsible use, they are putting the population at risk.”

As they say, compassion, courtesy, and information sharing are some of the key attributes of a physician. The Ministry of Health, NAFDAC, NCDC, and other related agencies must fight tooth and nail to inform the masses of the effect of unapproved treatment of COVID-19 theories, rumours, and traditional beliefs during this pandemic.
 
Anjorin, an inspirational speaker, columnist, and entrepreneur can be reached through olusanyaanjorin@gmail.com

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