Sunday, 28th November 2021
<To guardian.ng
Search
Breaking News:

The Weeknd’s Blinding Lights Named Billboard’s No. 1 Song Of All Time

By Oreoritse Tariemi
24 November 2021   |   10:19 am
The Weeknd's Blinding Lights has been named the number one song of all-time on Billboard's music charts. Billboard revealed that The Weeknd's single Blinding Lights had spent 90 weeks in the top 100 chart since it ousted Chubby Checker's 1960s hit The Twist to clinch the spot. The instant synth-pop-classic debuted in November 2019, topped the weekly Billboard Hot…

The Weeknd’s Blinding Lights has been named the number one song of all-time on Billboard’s music charts.

Billboard revealed that The Weeknd’s single Blinding Lights had spent 90 weeks in the top 100 chart since it ousted Chubby Checker’s 1960s hit The Twist to clinch the spot.

The instant synth-pop-classic debuted in November 2019, topped the weekly Billboard Hot 100 for four weeks in April and May 2020, and has spent a record-shattering 90 consecutive weeks on the chart.

Real name Abel Tesfaye, The Weeknd released Blinding Lights in November 2019, and one year later, the single had been streamed more than 2.5 billion times on Spotify.

A viral TikTok dance challenge further boosted the song’s popularity during the pandemic and The Weeknd’s performance at the Super Bowl half-time show in 2021.

Speaking on the song’s new status, The Weeknd told Billboard, “I don’t think [it] has hit me yet.” “I try not to dwell on it too much. I just count my blessings, and I’m just grateful.”

“By the time Blinding Lights happened, I was 10 years into my career and established as a music figure in the industry,” he said. “So I’m glad Blinding Lights happened when it happened as opposed to it being the first single I’ve ever dropped. That’d be scary for me.”

Blinding Lights was 2020’s biggest song in terms of sale and size, reinforcing the Canadian singer’s status as a global pop star a decade after first surfacing with introspective R&B and moody ballads.

For the last 63 years, Billboards rankings have been based on total weeks on the chart as well as exact chart positions, with adjustments made to account for chart turnover rates during various periods. It uses radio plays, sales and streaming to chart top songs.