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Academy empowers pharmacists on patient management

By Chukwuma Muanya
02 June 2016   |   1:52 am
He said the interactive meeting would create a platform for stronger engagement that ultimately empowers pharmacists and their staff to better serve their patient community.
Consultant Urologist, Dr. Funmilade Omisanjo (left); Managing Director, Victory Drugs, Folasade Lawal; Chairman of the Occasion, Lere Baale; Consultant Family Physician, Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) Idi-Araba, Dr. Nebe Nwamaka; Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon, Dr. Alimi Mustapha; Marketing Director, Pfizer Nigeria and East Africa Region, Winston Ailemoh; Consultant Cardiologist, Dr. Adanijo Monisola at the Pfizer Pharmacy Academy held at the Four Points by Sheraton Hotel, Victoria Island, Lagos.

Consultant Urologist, Dr. Funmilade Omisanjo (left); Managing Director, Victory Drugs, Folasade Lawal; Chairman of the Occasion, Lere Baale; Consultant Family Physician, Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) Idi-Araba, Dr. Nebe Nwamaka; Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon, Dr. Alimi Mustapha; Marketing Director, Pfizer Nigeria and East Africa Region, Winston Ailemoh; Consultant Cardiologist, Dr. Adanijo Monisola at the Pfizer Pharmacy Academy held at the Four Points by Sheraton Hotel, Victoria Island, Lagos.

Decries rising cases of erectile dysfunction in Nigeria, proffers solutions

Pfizer pharmaceuticals have set up an Academy, Pfizer Pharmacy Academy, to empower pharmacists on patient management and other clinical applications even as a team of medical experts have decried the rising cases of erectile dysfunction in the country and proffered solutions.

To this end, the foremost pharmaceutical firm has assembled a team of medical experts, which include: Consultant Urologist at Lagos State College of Medicine (LASUTH) Ikeja, Dr. Funmilade Omisanjo; Managing Director, Victory Drugs, Folasade Lawal; Chairman of the Occasion, Lere Baale; Consultant Family Physician, Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) Idi-Araba, Dr. Nebe Nwamaka; Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon, Dr. Alimi Mustapha; Marketing Director, Pfizer Nigeria and East Africa Region, Winston Ailemoh; and Consultant Cardiologist, Dr. Adanijo Monisola.

Monisola delivered a paper on Blood Pressure Variability, Blood Pressure monitoring and Cardiovascular Disease; Mustapha’s paper was on Key Considerations for Effective Pain Management; Nwamaka delivered a paper on Managing infections in the era of antibiotic resistance; and Omisanjo’s paper was on Demystifying Erectile Dysfunction.

Baale at the Pfizer Pharmacy Academy’s training of retail pharmacists held at the Four points by Sheraton Hotel, Victoria Island, Lagos, last week, said the objective of this year’s one-day Pfizer Pharmacy Academy was to deploy an impactful, world class integrated medical education/soft skills training to a minimum of 500 class A and B retail pharmacists and empower pharmacists to make appropriate recommendations.

He said the interactive meeting would create a platform for stronger engagement that ultimately empowers pharmacists and their staff to better serve their patient community.

The chairman of the occasion said the event demonstrates Pfizer’s commitment to world-class medical education, capacity building, and excellence in service to the Nigerian health sector.

Baale in his presentation said: “Empowering pharmacists about the principles of patient management with medications and the whole objective is to enhance their knowledge, to give them tools to influence them so that they can have a change of attitude towards new medicines and see the importance of new medications, how much savings every new innovation can bring. Every time you come up with a new medication, for every dollar you spend on new innovation you will save as much as eight dollars on hospitalization. Typically which is costing the United States (US) economy 300 billion on both hospitalization and associated costs of manning for those people, and they will be able to build their skills on the particular therapy area.

“They now have options or multiple options as to what they can do. It will also enhance their knowledge base on medication on the group of medication for that therapy area, which will therefore spur them into action to know that one can in a while they can pick the drug or they recommend the drug or pick a particular brand even though may be slightly higher in pricing it does not imply that it is cheaper overall. that you think a medicine is cheap does not mean the pharmacological profile, the biopharmaceutical profile of another, its creates more problem when the patient is going back to the hospital, the patient is going to be hospitalized, when the patient is taking a bed space that he shouldn’t have taken in the first instance, in a country like ours where we do not have enough bed space and so the compounding effects is more than imagined.

“We are also going to be looking at lessons to be learnt on those who will normally substitute or those who will normally say generics are better and without establishing that it is the same thing bio-pharmaceutically or in terms of bio- availability. So when this happen we believe that we will be able to learn some lessons from the experiences they will have before and begin to say ‘no’. If somebody needed to be given this brand but you cannot use pricing alone to determine which the best to be picked is. A number of people that will use pricing alone and does not have a means of protecting quality have become victims of substandard drugs; patients have had to have course perforations in typhoid. Many have been blinded on medications that they should have been able to use to manage glaucoma. I can keep on reeling out virtually all family have been affected by failure of healthcare practitioners to ensure and insists on people picking the right kind of medications.”

Omisanjo decried the rising cases of erectile dysfunction in Nigeria. The urologist said: “The figures we have with us will suggest that at least 30 per cent to 40 per cent who are above the age of 40 will have some degree of erectile dysfunction all be it the mild form of dysfunction. By the time you take men who are 60 years and above at least 25 per cent of them will have the very severe form of erectile dysfunction. So what that means is that if you sit amongst a group of 50 years old you can expect one out of every two of them to have some degree of erectile dysfunction, for most of them it will be the very mild form of erectile dysfunction. Mild in the sense that the men can still have some sexual intercourse but he may find out the extent of the hardness is penis is not what it used to be, because we measure erectile dysfunction not in the presence of or absence of erection, we also talk about the turgidity of the organ. So it is roughly about one in two in men above 50 years –For most of them mild degree to erectile dysfunction.”