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Jay Pizzle And The Voltage Of Vibes

By Chinonso Ihekire 
15 November 2021   |   12:16 pm
After falling in love with music at age 10, Joshua Osajiokwoeh never looked back again. The 32-year-old record producing whiz, better known as Jay Pizzle, has become a template for success via hard work and consistency. Since he went viral for his work on Terry G’s 2013 smash hit dubbed, Run Mad, Jay Pizzle has…

After falling in love with music at age 10, Joshua Osajiokwoeh never looked back again.

The 32-year-old record producing whiz, better known as Jay Pizzle, has become a template for success via hard work and consistency. Since he went viral for his work on Terry G’s 2013 smash hit dubbed, Run Mad, Jay Pizzle has retained a special Midas Touch on all his records, including his recently released debut EP dubbed, Voltage.

On Voltage, Jay Pizzle taps industry mavericks such as CDQ, Fiokee, Majeed, Jobaa, and Logos, to create a groovy Afro Street pop/Pop-heavy soundpiece. While the EP presents a laid-back, easy-going youthful bop, the EP glows for its masterful Amapiano undertone. And that is testament of Jay Pizzle’s creative dexterity.

While the four-track EP is laced with several gems, the Mozart sample on the Jobba-assisted Osho clearly confirms Jay Pizzle’s creative arsenal.

Speaking to Guardian Life, Jay Pizzle reveals that the EP is actually birthed from his creative pilgrimage during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Voltage is my first EP but I’ve dropped singles in the past. It was inspired during the lockdown when I was in London and got the idea, sent it to some artists to work on it. It wasn’t planned at all. It was birthed from boredom.”

While Jay Pizzle’s creative trademark has been infectious, groovy Melodie’s, he notes that the EP became a portal for him to turn it up a notch.

He said, “I dropped it in June and it was named voltage because of the sound. I wanted the sound to have a bang; an electro sound. We can say that it’s because of the energy it brings.”

After clinching several chart-topping records, Jay Pizzle has developed a formula for his own evolution: “I have learnt to do what I am passionate about without thinking about the money. Once the work is well done, the money will come.”

He lists his work on Kizz Daniel and Major Lazer’s Loyal, “because I had a lot of editing and corrections to make on that song.”

For a harbinger of happiness, Jay Pizzle ironically draws his muse from loneliness.

“I become extremely creative when I’m alone and when I’m happy but when I’m not in my best mood, I wouldn’t be able to to anything or if I do, it wouldn’t come out well,” he says.

After working with several A-list musicians, Jay Pizzle’s eyes are now on the future.

“I look forward to working with Oxlade, Bad boy Tims and other trending artists. I believe something good will come out of it.”

For a man of humble beginnings, his vision towers above his local limitations. For him his “vision is a big one. I am looking forward to foreign collaborations. Working with Wizkid, Burna boy who are the pacesetters in this industry. CKay too; I look forward to working with him.”