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Drinking Tea Can Influence Chances Of Getting Type 2 Diabetes

By Chinelo Eze
19 September 2022   |   1:56 pm
The moderate use of black, green, or oolong tea is associated with a lower risk of having type 2 diabetes, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis of 19 cohort studies involving more than 1 million adults from eight different countries. The research indicates that having at least four cups of tea per day is…

The moderate use of black, green, or oolong tea is associated with a lower risk of having type 2 diabetes, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis of 19 cohort studies involving more than 1 million adults from eight different countries.

The research indicates that having at least four cups of tea per day is linked to a 17% lower risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) over an average of ten years, according to findings presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden.

Because of the numerous antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic components that tea naturally contains, it has long been known that drinking tea frequently may be healthy, but the link between tea consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes has been less obvious. Cohort studies and meta-analyses that have been published so far have presented conflicting results.

To clarify the connection between tea drinking and future T2DM risk, researchers carried out a cohort study and a dose-response meta-analysis.

First, they looked at 5,199 participants (2583 men and 2616 women; average age, 42) from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), who were enrolled in 1997 and followed up within 2009 and had no prior history of T2D. The CHNS is a multicenter prospective study that examines inhabitants from nine provinces’ socioeconomic conditions as well as their physical and mental health.

Participants initially completed a food and drink frequency questionnaire and supplied details on lifestyle choices such as regular exercise, smoking, and alcohol use. 2,379 (46%) participants reported drinking tea overall, and 522 (10%) persons had T2D by the conclusion of the trial.

Researchers discovered that tea consumption reduced the risk of T2D after controlling for factors like age, sex, and physical inactivity.

First, they looked at 5,199 participants (2583 men and 2616 women; average age, 42) from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), who were enrolled in 1997 and followed up within 2009 and had no prior history of T2D. The CHNS is a multicenter prospective study that examines inhabitants from nine provinces’ socioeconomic conditions as well as their physical and mental health.

Participants initially completed a food and drink frequency questionnaire and supplied details on lifestyle choices such as regular exercise, smoking, and alcohol use. 2,379 (46%) participants reported drinking tea overall, and 522 (10%) persons had T2D by the conclusion of the trial.

Researchers discovered that tea drinkers and non-drinkers had comparable risks of getting type 2 diabetes (T2D) after correcting for variables such as age, sex, and physical inactivity that are known to be associated with a higher risk of T2D.