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What Is Aphasia Disease And How Do You Treat It?

By Chinelo Eze
02 April 2022   |   8:55 am
What is aphasia disease? Aphasia is a condition that influences your capacity to communicate. It can influence the way one writes and comprehends spoken words and written words, it also influences speech.  Aphasia regularly happens all of a sudden after a stroke or a head damage.  But it can be a progressive disease from a…

What is aphasia disease? Aphasia is a condition that influences your capacity to communicate. It can influence the way one writes and comprehends spoken words and written words, it also influences speech. 

Aphasia regularly happens all of a sudden after a stroke or a head damage. 

But it can be a progressive disease from a slow-growing brain tumour or a malady that causes dynamic, changeless harm.

The seriousness of aphasia depends on a number of conditions, counting the cause and the degree of the brain harm.

In simple terms Aphasia is a condition that results in loss of language, often arising from  injury to the portions of the brain that are in charge of language.

The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, categorises  aphasia as most commonly present suddenly after an injury or stroke, but can also develop slowly in connection with a brain tumour or progressive disease.

There are three main classifications of aphasia:

Global aphasia ensues from substantial injury to the brain’s language centres, and is defined by bad understanding and complications with speaking.

Expressive aphasia, which is also referred to as Broca’s or non-fluent aphasia, enables someone to comprehend the things people utter, but makes it hard for the person to speak themselves.

Comprehensive aphasia, also known as fluent aphasia or Wernicke’s, is commonly known by someone speaking in complex and long sentences that are meaningless, also having needless or made-up words. This type of aphasia also gives rise to difficulty in understanding others.

A study  suggests that in Nigeria,  96% of its population, who experience stroke experience aphasia. The National Aphasia Association totals that the disease is more widespread than cerebral palsy, Parkinson’s Disease, or muscular dystrophy with almost 180,000 Americans acquiring the disease annually having a total of 2 million Americans affected by it.

Aphasia solution strives to assist the individual communicate by adopting lingering language skills or restoring as much language as possible, also learning alternative means of communication like sign language or using electronic gadgets.

According to the National Aphasia Association there are  advice for relating with an individual who has aphasia, they include:

Aim for less sentences, repeating main words you want comprehended.

Sustain eye contact while observing the body language the person is employing.

Let the words used be easy words, not disregarding that the person spoken to is an adult.

Endeavour that your speech is slow and not fast.

Inquire “yes” and “no” questions that could be simpler for the individual to answer.

Have conversations in a calm area, without any radio or television to interfere.

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