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Women With Stories, ACM seek innovative ideas for creative economy

By Ijeoma Thomas-Odia
17 September 2022   |   3:54 am
The Women With Stories (TWWS) has partnered with Africa Creative Market (ACM) to organise a conference that brought major stakeholders in the African and international creative industry together to explore and exchange innovative ideas for Africa’s creative economy.

The Women With Stories (TWWS) has partnered with Africa Creative Market (ACM) to organise a conference that brought major stakeholders in the African and international creative industry together to explore and exchange innovative ideas for Africa’s creative economy.

TWWS is known for empowering women across the globe to find and own their unique stories and serve others with the gift of their story.

The conference, which held with the theme, ‘Trash the Labels’, was aimed at equipping mothers and daughters with tools that would help them break the communication barrier existing between them and ultimately step into their fullest potential, serving humanity with their uniqueness.

The three-day event, which took place at the Lagos Continental Hotel, had Storytelling and Female Bonding sessions on day one, while day two and three held at the Landmark Event Centre for the ‘Slay Like A Mother’ and Emotional Wellness/Therapy master classes.

In her opening speech, the Chief Storyteller, Dr. Naomi Osemedua, noted that “once upon a time never gets old”, emphasising the need for everyone to share with the world stories burning in his or her heart.

The keynote speaker and author of the focus book for the workshop, ‘Slay Like A Mother’, Katherine Wintsch, delivered a research-driven and insightful contribution to enable participants “slay their dragons.”

In revealing her journey to healing, she said: “I am not a magician. I did not wave the magic wand and heal myself; I went through lots of therapy.”

In dealing with the issue of self-doubt, Wintsch pointed out that the number one way people feed their dragon of self-doubt is by setting expectations that cannot achieved.

“When we fall short, we tell ourselves that we suck. Then what do we do? We make them even higher because we believe that if we can achieve these expectations, we are finally going to feel good about ourselves,” she added.

She, however, admonished participants to be realistic in their goal setting and learn to give themselves the space to breathe.

Another speaker at the event, Abimbola Akintoye-Oguntunde, pointed out many ways women play the victim instead of giving themselves the permission to flourish freely.

The master classes employed the tools of therapy, labeling, speaker-participant mechanism as well as mind re-engineering to the delight of the participants, which included African and international celebrities, major film makers and stakeholders in the creative space.